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Heritage and Archaeology in the Digital Age : Acquisition, Curation, and Dissemination of Spatial Cultural Heritage Data / edited by Matthew L. Vincent, Víctor Manuel López-Menchero Bendicho, Marinos Ioannides, Thomas E. Levy.

Contributor(s): Ioannides, Marinos [editor.] | Levy, Thomas E [editor.] | López-Menchero Bendicho, Víctor Manuel [editor.] | Vincent, Matthew L [editor.]Series: Quantitative Methods in the Humanities and Social SciencesPublisher: Cham : Springer International Publishing : Imprint: Springer, 2017Edition: 1st ed. 2017Description: 1 online resource (XVIII, 198 pages 107 illustrations, 101 illustrations in color.)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319653709Subject(s): Archaeology | Ethnology | Statistics | Statistics for Social Sciences, Humanities, Law | Archaeology | Cultural AnthropologyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Heritage and archaeology in the digitalage.; Printed edition:: No title; Printed edition:: No title; Printed edition:: No titleDDC classification: 519.5
Contents:
Introduction. Chapter 1. Data Acquisition for 3D Geometric Recording: State of the Art and Recent Innovations -- Chapter 2. Holistic Approaches to the Comprehensive Management of Rock Art in the Digital Age -- Chapter 3. Materials Characterization for Cultural Heritage: XRF Case Studies in Archaeology and Art -- Chapter 4. TerraWatchers, Crowdsourcing, and At-Risk World Heritage in the Middle East -- Chapter 5. Crowdsourced Data for Cultural Heritage -- Chapter 6. Cultural Heritage Data Management: The Role of Formal Ontology and CIDOC CRM -- Chapter 7. A New Approach to Online Visual Analysis and Sharing of Archaeological Surveys and Image Collections -- Chapter 8. Delphi4Delphi: Data Acquisition of Spatial Cultural Heritage Data for Ancient Delphi, Greece -- Chapter 9. Pedagogy and Engagement in At-Risk World Heritage Initiatives.
Summary: This book examines how computer-based programs can be used to acquire 'big' digital cultural heritage data, curate, and disseminate it over the Internet and in 3D visualization platforms with the ultimate goal of creating long-lasting "digital heritage repositories.' The organization of the book reflects the essence of new technologies applied to cultural heritage and archaeology. Each of these stages bring their own challenges and considerations that need to be dealt with. The authors in each section present case studies and overviews of how each of these aspects might be dealt with. While technology is rapidly changing, the principles laid out in these chapters should serve as a guide for many years to come. The influence of the digital world on archaeology and cultural heritage will continue to shape these disciplines as advances in these technologies facilitate new lines of research. The book is divided into three sections covering acquisition, curation, and dissemination (the major life cycles of cultural heritage data). Acquisition is one of the fundamental challenges for practitioners in heritage and archaeology, and the chapters in this section provide a template that highlights the principles for present and future work that will provide sustainable models for digital documentation. Following acquisition, the next section highlights how equally important curation is as the future of digital documentation depends on it. Preservation of digital data requires preservation that can guarantee a future for generations to come. The final section focuses on dissemination as it is what pushes the data beyond the shelves of storage and allows the public to experience the past through these new technologies, but also opens new lines of investigation by giving access to these data to researchers around the globe. Digital technology promises significant changes in how we approach social sciences, cultural heritage, and archaeology. However, researchers must consider not only the acquisition and curation, but also the dissemination of these data to their colleagues and the public. Throughout the book, many of the authors have highlighted the usefulness of Structure from Motion (SfM) work for cultural heritage documentation; others the utility and excitement of crowdsourcing as a 'citizen scientist' tool to engage not only trained students and researchers, but also the public in the cyber-archaeology endeavor. Both innovative tools facilitate the curation of digital cultural heritage and its dissemination. Together with all the chapters in this volume, the authors will help archaeologists, researchers interested in the digital humanities and scholars who focus on digital cultural heritage to assess where the field is and where it is going.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books The BIAA David H. French Library
Shelf 66 - Reading Room
G2f VINCE 32506 Not for loan BOOKS-000000025384

Introduction. Chapter 1. Data Acquisition for 3D Geometric Recording: State of the Art and Recent Innovations -- Chapter 2. Holistic Approaches to the Comprehensive Management of Rock Art in the Digital Age -- Chapter 3. Materials Characterization for Cultural Heritage: XRF Case Studies in Archaeology and Art -- Chapter 4. TerraWatchers, Crowdsourcing, and At-Risk World Heritage in the Middle East -- Chapter 5. Crowdsourced Data for Cultural Heritage -- Chapter 6. Cultural Heritage Data Management: The Role of Formal Ontology and CIDOC CRM -- Chapter 7. A New Approach to Online Visual Analysis and Sharing of Archaeological Surveys and Image Collections -- Chapter 8. Delphi4Delphi: Data Acquisition of Spatial Cultural Heritage Data for Ancient Delphi, Greece -- Chapter 9. Pedagogy and Engagement in At-Risk World Heritage Initiatives.

This book examines how computer-based programs can be used to acquire 'big' digital cultural heritage data, curate, and disseminate it over the Internet and in 3D visualization platforms with the ultimate goal of creating long-lasting "digital heritage repositories.' The organization of the book reflects the essence of new technologies applied to cultural heritage and archaeology. Each of these stages bring their own challenges and considerations that need to be dealt with. The authors in each section present case studies and overviews of how each of these aspects might be dealt with. While technology is rapidly changing, the principles laid out in these chapters should serve as a guide for many years to come. The influence of the digital world on archaeology and cultural heritage will continue to shape these disciplines as advances in these technologies facilitate new lines of research. The book is divided into three sections covering acquisition, curation, and dissemination (the major life cycles of cultural heritage data). Acquisition is one of the fundamental challenges for practitioners in heritage and archaeology, and the chapters in this section provide a template that highlights the principles for present and future work that will provide sustainable models for digital documentation. Following acquisition, the next section highlights how equally important curation is as the future of digital documentation depends on it. Preservation of digital data requires preservation that can guarantee a future for generations to come. The final section focuses on dissemination as it is what pushes the data beyond the shelves of storage and allows the public to experience the past through these new technologies, but also opens new lines of investigation by giving access to these data to researchers around the globe. Digital technology promises significant changes in how we approach social sciences, cultural heritage, and archaeology. However, researchers must consider not only the acquisition and curation, but also the dissemination of these data to their colleagues and the public. Throughout the book, many of the authors have highlighted the usefulness of Structure from Motion (SfM) work for cultural heritage documentation; others the utility and excitement of crowdsourcing as a 'citizen scientist' tool to engage not only trained students and researchers, but also the public in the cyber-archaeology endeavor. Both innovative tools facilitate the curation of digital cultural heritage and its dissemination. Together with all the chapters in this volume, the authors will help archaeologists, researchers interested in the digital humanities and scholars who focus on digital cultural heritage to assess where the field is and where it is going.

Zero Purchase 2021-07-07 £144.50

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